Sunday, April 3, 2016

I See... The 161 Things I Learned at General Conference This Weekend

Below is a list of 161 things the Mormon Third Eye learned at General Conference this weekend.  I haven't included authors of these gems because, in the end, it was the spirit that moved me to record them.
  1. - Obedience is a liberating path to divine destiny.
  2. - Obedience helps us discover what we are really made of.
  3. - Obedience is not an end to itself.
  4. - Obedience is the lifeblood of faith.
  5. - As, we increase in faith we must also increase in faithfulness.
  6. - If you cannot muster faith, begin with hope.
  7. - Good will not rescue us against our will.
  8. - Good is fully aware of those who are lost.
  9. - Our Father in Heaven has the ability to restore those who are fallen.
  10. - Never underestimate the power of the other side of the veil in the temple.
  11. - The mirrors in the celestial room remind us how the ordinances there connect us with our ancestors and descendants.
  12. - We are all equal before God in the temple.
  13. - God organizes eternal families only in temple.
  14. - Temple worship brings us happiness, fulfillment and peace.
  15. - Despite the lack of righteousness in the world, we live in a sacred and holy time.
  16. - See yourself in the temple.
  17. - Priesthood holders should live the kind of life that brings purity to their wife and children.
  18. - The media needs to show more examples of righteous fathers.
  19. - Loving the mother of his children and showing it are two best things a dad can do for his children.
  20. - Spending time away at work to provide for a family is the essence of fatherhood.
  21. - When providing a correction a father should be motivated by love.
  22. - The most essential work of a father is to turn the hearts of his children to their Heavenly Father.
  23. - Fatherhood exposes us to our own weaknesses and the need to improve.
  24. - Far from being superfluous, fathers are unique and important.
  25. - We will find peace in your lives when we walk with Jesus Christ
  26. - The reach of the atonement is as individual as it is infinite.
  27. - We need to continuously partake of the fruit of the tree of life.
  28. - Never has the great and spacious building been so crowded.
  29. - In everything we do in the temple, we are pointed to Jesus Christ.
  30. - Learn listen and walk in the path of the Savior.
  31. - The road we travel through sorrow and trials is made easier when we think about Jesus.
  32. - Membership in the Lord’s kingdom is a gift of immeasurable value.
  33. - The greatest challenge of youth today is the great and spacious building that surrounds them.
  34. - Conversion comes from serving those around us.
  35. - We need to get the gospel from our heads to our hearts.
  36. - We have a knowledge of the gospel. But do we believe it?
  37. - This church is more than a good place to go on Sunday.
  38. - The gift of repentance allows us to correct our course settings.
  39. - The choices we make determine our destiny.
  40. - Remember who we are. Pause to consider the consequences.
  41. - We are the recipients of a sacred trust. Much is expected of us.
  42. - The most important work you will ever do will be within the walls of your own home.
  43. - Purity will be the protection of your marraige and family.
  44. - Our priesthood obligation is to put our families, and those that we serve, first.
  45. - We all can be saviors of strong families.
  46. - Charity defines Christ and pride defines Satan. Mercy triumphs over judgment.
  47. - Whatever problems we have, the beginning and the end of them is charity.
  48. - Those who save marriages pull out the weeds and water the flowers.
  49. - Astonish your wife by choosing to make her happy.
  50. - If it appears to take forever to build a great marriage, remember that it is for eternity.
  51. - Great marriages are built brick by brick.
  52. - If there really was a perfect woman do you think she would be interested in you?
  53. - The safe path is integrity and loyalty to covenants.
  54. - Strong marriages don't just happen because we are members of the church.
  55. - Replacing the original with something more modern in marriages brings sorrow.
  56. - In the very act of following Christ we are leading others to him.
  57. - We cannot be satisfied receiving spiritual blessings just for ourselves.
  58. - Leadership is an expression of discipleship.
  59. - We need to see young men not as they are but as they can become.
  60. - Jesus Christ sets the perfect example of qualities of both leadership and being followers.
  61. - Priesthood power can calm the fractures in the hearts of our families and overcome the spiritual, emotional and financial earthquakes in our homes.
  62. - We need to embrace our wives and their counsel.
  63. - Are we willing to follow President Monson’s example of serving others?
  64. - To increase our power in the priesthood we need to pray from the heart.
  65. - We need to live up to our privileges of the priesthood.
  66. - There are too many men who have the authority but not the power of the priesthood because their access is blocked by their sins.
  67. - The atonement of Jesus Christ can purify us.
  68. - Children are desperately v seeking parents willing to bbc.co listen to them
  69. - Councils are where parents listen to each other and their children.
  70. - The irony of being good parents is that we get good at it after our children have left home.
  71. - Ordinances invite spiritual power and purpose into our lives.
  72. - Baptism is not a destination we should desire to visit over and over again.
  73. - The sacrament is an opportunity to repent sincerely and be renewed spiritually.
  74. - There is an inseparable relationship between baptism, confirmation, and the sacrament.
  75. - Ordinances are far more than rituals or symbolic ordinances.
  76. - Both the Holy Ghost and ordinances have a role in spiritual rebirth.
  77. - The Book of Mormon brings us closer to Christ than any other book.
  78. - We are all called to go to the rescue.
  79. - Bring one soul unto Christ.
  80. - We must never give up.
  81. - We must not delay going to the rescue.
  82. - What a marvelous role grandparents can play in the lives of their grandchildren.
  83. - We need to reach out to the youth who are beyond the fence.
  84. - The greatest tool in keeping youth included is other righteous youth.
  85. - Knowing someone's name can make a difference.
  86. - These youth need our time and our testimonies.
  87. - A child's spiritual DNA is perfect.
  88. - Reach out and take the Savior’s hand through the hand of our leaders.
  89. - No one goes on his way alone.
  90. - Are you standing with leaders in a darkened world to spread the light of Christ?
  91. - Righteous leaders walk the path of life with you.
  92. - The sacrament is indispensable to a spiritual foundation.
  93. - The Lord is more accepting of repentant sinners than those who feel no need to repent.
  94. The best way to grow closer to the Lord is to prepare for the sacrament.
  95. - The closer we are to God, the more we are to feel thankful and not entitled
  96. - The greater the distance between the giver and receiver the more likely the receiver is likely to feel a sense of entitlement.
  97. - We need to be humble before we walk through the valley of humility.
  98. - We need to teach our children to be self confident and selfless.
  99. - Some of the greatest sermons are taught by the singing of hymns.
  100. - The atonement is not only for those who need to repent but also for those who need to forgive.
  101. - We need to win and lose with grace.
  102. - We should not be defined by the worst thing we have ever done.
  103. - We all have people in our lives with Saul-like lives but Paul-like potential.
  104. - An unforgiving heart harbors so much needless pain. God will compensate us for every injustice we experience.
  105. - Forgiveness is the Lord's way to escape the burdens of injustices caused by others.
  106. - The Lord will not leave us out in the cold without keys.
  107. - Go forward with faith.
  108. - Without the keys of the restoration we would be locked out of our blessings of eternal life.
  109. - We live in a world that can make us forget who we are.
  110. - You can have what you want our you can have something better
  111. - Our first response to hardship should be to remember who we are.
  112. - A correct understanding of our eternal heritage is critical to our eternal future.
  113. - We are children of a living God
  114. - We need to prepare homes and children to feel the still small voice.
  115. - The things of this world can drown out the spirit.
  116. - Pray with full purpose of heart.
  117. - Choose to have your heart softened.
  118. - The Lord is in our midst.
  119. - Heaven is cheering us on.
  120. - All things work together for good for those who love God.
  121. - The first great commandment is to love God but he loved us first.
  122. - We, are to judge righteously, not self righteously or unrighteously.
  123. - The Lord blesses those who want to improve and want to keep the commandments.
  124. - The great thing about the gospel is that we get credit for trying even if we do not achieve it.
  125. - Don't give up if you can't do everything you have learned at conference.
  126. - The members are the miracle of this church.
  127. - The reality of the resurrection overwhelms our heartbreak with hope.
  128. - We all can be part of a cloud of witnesses that the resurrection is real.
  129. - Resurrection is the ultimate cure for all our ills.
  130. - Living as spirits without our bodies is a form of captivity.
  131. - The Savior’s resurrection brought total victory over death.
  132. - The temple can change our lives forever.
  133. - Everything we do in the church is to prepare us to go to the temple.
  134. - The real power of the temple is found in its ordinances.
  135. - We have an assurance that good will consecrate or trials for our gain.
  136. - Some things can only be learned by faith.
  137. - There is no warrant for a loyal opposition in the government of God.
  138. - We are not to be at ease in Zion.
  139. - The Lord does not make life easy but he does make it possible.
  140. - Opposition is central to the plan off what are to become.
  141. - Opposition is part of the plan for our mortality.
  142. - That Satan who opposed the Father's plan actually facilitated it.
  143. - From the beginning agency and opposition are central to the Father's plan for us.
  144. - The Savior satisfies the eternal demands of justice.
  145. - This moment of hardship does not define refugees but helping them will define us.
  146. - Meeting refugee families personally and not learning about them from a screen will change you forever.
  147. - Begin on your knees in prayer then find some place to help locally.
  148. - We must be careful that the news of refugees flight does not become commonplace.
  149. - The Savior knows what it is like to be a refugee; he was one.
  150. - God always welcomes us home. Our Savior invites us to remember Him as he always remembers us.
  151. - Life is not as cruel as it can sometime seem.
  152. - God knows everything we don't want anyone to know about us yet loves us anyway.
  153. - We can remember Him by serving others.
  154. - We can remember God by acknowledging the hand of the Lord in all things.
  155. - Remembering and forgetting are a part of our eternal journey.
  156. - Through the Holy Ghost we experience a multitude of miracles that never cease.
  157. - Seeking the counsel of the Holy Ghost in all things trivializes it.
  158. - Keeping our covenants will prevent us from being deceived by Holy Ghost impersonators.
  159. - The Holy Ghost respects our agency.
  160. - The Holy Ghost is not given to us to control us.
  161. - Personal revelation is essential.

Sunday, March 13, 2016

I See... Singing with the Mormon Tabernacle Choir

March has been a remarkable month of firsts for the Mormon Third Eye. Last week I wrote about my first heart attack. This week I reference an even more monumental accomplishment- my first singing engagement with the Mormon Tabernacle Choir! Let me explain.
Image result for mormon tabernacle choir
I've been an avid fan of the book of Isaiah and Handel's Messiah. His prophecies of the first and second coming of Christ put to music by Handel introduced my heart to the gospel as teenager too many years ago. Since then I have chased after every rational opportunity to join others in singing this inspired oratorio in attempts to resurrect those original feelings of joy and commitment to the Savior. For many years the highlight of my Christmas season has been spending long hours with like-minded souls practicing and performing selections from Handel's Messiah. Even so, thoughts of singing THAT with the Motab existed far beyond the realms of reality; they were practically unthinkable.

Last month, however, technology and creativity caught up with reality. The Motab, through the miracle of the Internet, gave anyone with a computer the opportunity to participate with them in a virtual performance of the Hallelujah Chorus. They provided the sheet music, a conductor, and the Motab to sing along with me. All I had to was record myself singing along with them and post it on youtube with the Hallelujah hashtag. With the help of youtube musical wizards Peter and Evynne Hollens, the Motab folks blended my submission with thousands of others to produce the most awesome version of the Hallelujah chorus ever sung, which was released today here:
virtual-choir-blog.jpg


Time to dream again. More marvelous unthinkable achievements await me. Join me.

Sunday, March 6, 2016

I See... My First Heart Attack!

I missed my regular Sunday blogpost last week, but I have a real good reason- I suffered a heart attack.

Many people never forget the time and place of significant events in their lives. When and where they were married, discovered all-you-can-eat buffets, hit a cow with their car, etc., The men in my family enjoy a generational history of heart problems, so I knew it was coming; nevertheless I wasn't expecting it in the time and place it occurred- early Monday seminary morning.

Two Monday mornings ago I arrived at the seminary room at approximately 5:45 am, as I do most mornings, to make sure the room and the environment is prepared to receive 22 sleepy students seeking spiritual nourishment. As I opened the door and flicked on the lights, I saw an army of miniature hand-cut hearts placed lovingly on the desks loaded with words of praise and encouragement. On the chalkboard someone had written “ Bro. Tait – I aspire to have the spirit with me as much as you have it with you.”


Our whole class had suffered a heart attack! Somehow we survived but certainly a memory was made. I wouldn't mind having another one!

Sunday, February 21, 2016

I See... The Nameless Young Sister Missionary

The Mormon Third Eye, with the awesome social media power of the blogsophere, is continually striving to shine the spotlight on the remarkably important yet seemingly minor acts of gospel courage that can define us. This week the MTE is highlighting the unsung heroes of missionary work strewn throughout the scriptures.

We frequently hear about the magnificent missionary exploits of Ammon, Alma, and the other sons of Mosiah. Abinadi was bold and Amulek was powerful in their preaching. Moroni's invitation to “come unto Christ and be perfected in him” is an invitation to explore the Gospel of Jesus Christ that continues to have impact spanning thousands of years.

But what about the nameless army of everyday missionaries hidden in scriptural accounts of heathens turning their hearts towards God? One of my favorites is the nameless young Israelite maiden who appears out of nowhere in 2nd Kings 5. She was the war booty of a successful Syrian foray into Israelite territory, a captive brought back to serve as the handmaiden of Naaman's wife. Naaman was deserved of such an honor, for he was the captain of the Syrian army who had served his king well. While Naaman was a “mighty man of valor,” he was also.... a leper.

The young Israelite maiden, obvious aware of her master's husband's challenge, innocently issued the following invitation to follow that day's prophet: “Would God my lord were with the prophet that is in Samaria! for he would recover him of his leprosy.”

The rest is history. The King of Syria arranged via the King of Israel for the leader of his armies to visit the prophet Elisha, who instructed him to wash himself in the river Jordan seven times to be healed. After some initial soul searching, he did what he was told and it worked! Naaman now knew that “there is no God in all the earth, but in Israel.”

I still don't know the young Israelite handmaiden's name, but I have been motivated and inspired by her story. I also know that in our days, there is an awesome army of valiant Israelite handmaidens of all ages in church-wide missionary, Relief Society, Young Women, and Primary organizations, who soften hearts and open doors to the gospel for those that they serve. I only know a few of their names- my wife, my daughter, my daughter-in-law, and certain women I remember from home wards in North Carolina and Maryland.


If they all act in the tradition of a nameless young handmaiden in 2nd Kings 5, the church has nothing to worry about.   

Sunday, February 14, 2016

I See... Always

Sometimes, one word can mean everything; it can be the tip of a powerful emotional and spiritual iceberg that hints at something much more meaningful and lasting underneath.

Several years ago I was listlessly lounging around in a long line waiting to board an airplane to somewhere distant and doing what I always do- missing my better half. My heart was momentarily soft and fertile ground for tender emotions. Standing right in front of me was a grey-haired gentlemen much older than me, smiling and chatting amicably with a much younger 30-something wholesome-looking blue-eyed beauty. Their casual, familiar banter made it obvious that they were related somehow. Was she his daughter? granddaughter? Hard to tell. All I could tell from bits of randomly overheard conversation was that they knew each other well, and he was going away for an extended length of time... and she was not.

Soon the loose line in front of us instinctively started organizing and compacting- we were about to board. The charming young lady gave her father/grandfather a warm, final hug and started to walk away. She was about ten feet away when the elderly father figure turned around to throw out one final edict of advice- “Be good!” She paused for a moment, and then with smiling eyes meant to wrap ultimate comfort around an old man's weathered heart, replied softly but convincingly with one precious word of promise- “Always!”


For some unknowable reason, I had apparently wandered into the line of conversational fire. Her one-word covenant permanently froze that moment in time for me. Why? Even to this day I'm not completely sure. They were just two random strangers saying goodbye- I still don't know who they are. It's only one word in one moment, but perhaps it stuck so well because I was deep in yearning for the companionship of my own eternal companion- always.  

Sunday, February 7, 2016

I See... Hero Worship

As Latter-day Saints we are warned against hero worship.  No matter how marvelous and mighty our accomplishments may be, or how many lives we may save in the operating room, on the battlefield, or in the bishop's office, the most noble course of action is to rightly assign the glory to God.  The scriptures are replete with stories of joy and tragedy when prophets and leaders chose to either identify the Savior as their source of strength or highlight their own superior skills.  
However, what do you do with the letter cut and pasted below? A close friend of mine showed me the text of this email he received from his young adult daughter away from home at college:

“Dear Dad,
I wanted to let you know just how much I look up to you. How much your faith and example means in my life. To put it simply you are my hero. You where there in my darkest hours. Telling me to have hope in a future I could not see. Your strength gave me strength and without your kind words of encouragement I would not be where I am. Thank you for seeing the bigger picture. I know that I can and will be happy because of you. To hear the stories of how you prayed for me when I was hurting and far away gives me comfort even though you are not here. You have scared off the monsters in my closest and helped me to fight the ones in my mind and heart. You're my big teddy bear and my dad. You are always there when I need you. I know how busy you can be and I often don't express how much you mean to me but I'm glad you're my dad. Again you are my hero and I want nothing more than to find someone like you to spend my life with. Mom is lucky to have you and I am privileged to have you for a dad.”

You do what prophets and apostles and parents have done since the beginning of time- thank God.




Sunday, January 31, 2016

I See... Disarming the BYU- Utah Rivalry

The Mormon Third Eye specializes in offering unconventional yet practical solutions to thorny problems. Whether its the four rules of successful living, keeping your teenagers out of trouble at stake dances, or just breaking the FemaleGift Code, the MTE has consistently provided workable solutions to some of the most relevant challenges in today's LDS families.
Few dilemmas should be as relevant and challenging to LDS families (especially the mixed marriagesreferenced here) than the torturous trials facing BYU and UofU sports aficionados joyfully participating in the overheated collegiate rivalry, affectionately labelled “the Holy War.” UofU basketball coach Bill Krystkowiak highlighted some problematic elements to the 109-year tradition when he chose to unilaterally cancel current and future basketball games with BYU rather than wrestle with the heated tensions and emotions associated with winning and losing. Players throwing punches, confident coaches viciously and openly criticizing opposing fear-laden coaches' attempts to weasel out of scheduled games, cruel jokes about fat coeds at both schools and the mothers of opposing team's players; it's spiraled way out of hand.

However, the MTE has done it's research and has the answer. Put your seatbelt on- the solution is wildly creative yet sensible.

Inspiration for this approach came from the story about an inspirational high school football game between Grapevine Faith Christian School and Gainesville State in Texas. Grapevine was a perennial football powerhouse regularly fielding 70 players and a staff of 11 coaches. Gainesville State is actually a ragtag team of 14 players from Gainesville State Youth Penitentiary who are escorted on and off the field by armed guards. Gainesville had gone 0-9 that year; they were used to the taunts of opposing player and parents complaining about having to compete against criminals.

The Grapevine coach did something truly remarkable to help the team and school prepare for the big game ahead. He asked Grapevine students, fans, and parents to form a formidable cheering squad for Gainesville State. You can read more about that here.

Gainesville State lost that game 33-14, but their players celebrated as if they had won. Since then the annual game has been renamed the “One Heart Bowl,” with an excited cadre of Grapevine Faith Academy parents, students, and cheerleaders effusively encouraging Gainesville State forward to it's next touchdown.

The implications of applying this same principle to the BYU-Utah rivalry are nothing short of mind-boggling. Imagine for a moment BYU assuming the role of Grapevine Faith Academy and asking some of it's alumni, parents, and students to wear red and root for Utah the next time they come to play in the Marriott Center or Edwards Stadium. Even if Utah lost, they would leave the contest full of hope that they were loved and appreciated despite their obvious personnel and leadership challenges. Rivalry tensions would magically meltaway under the bright sun of BYU benevolence.


I'm ready! Who will join me!  

Sunday, January 24, 2016

I See... Brian and Leslie's Dad

Eons ago, while serving in the Korea Pusan Mission, the onslaught of new and strange Korean customs confused me. Daily consumption of large portions of cabbage pickled in red pepper juice, sleeping on the floor, bathing only three times a week at the public bath house down the street, etc.; as a freshly-scrubbed 19 year-old young man who had spent all of his formative years in the white-bread world of pre-1980's Northern California, this chance to totally immerse myself in a foreign culture was both a strange and exciting shock to my world paradigm. However, by the end of my grand two-year experiment of eating their kimchi, sleeping on their floors, and bathing with them, I came to understand and love everything about them. However, there was still one uniquely cultural element that befuddled me:- familiar names that parents used to talk about each other.

When Korean moms and dads chatted at church on Sundays or the rare ward parties on Saturday afternoons, they always referred to each other as “so-and-so's mother” or father instead of using their own names. As an earnest missionary trying to convey the precious pearls of gospel to a people I had grown to truly love and respect, it was difficult to track who was talking about who during random discussions overheard in the hallways. Who in the heck was Young-hee's mother? Myong-soo's dad lost his job again. Who is that?

In this world, my wife and I would be known as Brian or Les's mom or dad. I initially blindly attributed this practice to the traditional Korean emphasis on the nuclear family and the unusually large but standard sacrifices Korean parents make for their children to be successful. However, as the years and decades marched on and I bought into the stereotype of spoiled Korean anklebiters coddled by overworked moms and dads, I had to dig deeper and try harder to understand why valiant and sacrificing parents would choose to bury their own identities behind the names of their children.

Brian and Leslie have left the nest and are living their own lives now. As an interested bystander I watch them independently make courageously right choices on dating, marriage, school, career, and faith, and my soul beams with spiritual pride. I often catch myself dramatically proclaiming on Facebook or in the lobby during Sunday meetings, “ Yes, this is my son. My son.” Or “Leslie is my daughter. My daughter.”


Now I understand. You can call me “Richard,” “Brian's dad,” or “Leslie's dad.” I'll answer to each one of them.

Sunday, January 17, 2016

I See.. What Would Walker Texas Ranger Do?

It's a proven psychological fact that whatever we last put in heads at night before we wander into slumber has a more lasting effect on our character than anything else we've done that day. That's why so many faithful Mormons arrange their bedtime rituals to include scripture study and sincere prayer. Could there be anything better sashaying throughout our subconscious during these most formative hours than stories of stripling warriors and spiritual impulses encompassing the Savior's love for us?

Hardly. Yet a few months ago I found myself at bedtime being inextricably drawn into the moralistic crusading world of “Walker Texas Ranger,” a popular 1990's TV drama, where black was always black and white was always white. In Walker Texas Ranger's world of reruns, whether it be the evils of drugs, alcohol, sexual abuse, or gang violence, the good guys always won in the end, albeit after 50 minutes of enduring seemingly endless and patently offensive actions by antagonists hell bent on destroying all that is right and good in the world in the name of selfish gain. Evil was almost always decisively defeated via Cordell Walker, the testosterone-laden hero, offering up a heapin' helping of vicious martial arts kicks and punches. You could count on it. Although I still may have had a scripture in my head and a prayer in my heart when sleep arrived every night, it was accompanied with comforting thoughts that right would always prevail.
One recent evening, while satisfying my new-found Walker Texas Ranger fix, I was confronted with my own clear moral dilemma. A close friend far away was enduring a temporary but real and deep emotional tragedy and needed to hear my comforting voice on the phone. Now. However, I was 45 minutes into Walker Texas Ranger tracking down a den of international drug kingpins about to brutally torture the crusading widowed senator's completely innocent teenage only daughter (his wife had been murdered by drug lords just two years earlier), and I just HAD to know if Walker would reach her in time. Wouldn't you? Couldn't my close friend's emotional emergency wait 15 minutes?

Tensions were mounting. In the reel world, Walker, with the awesome power of his bare hands and feet, was quickly mowing down legions of oversized neanderthal thugs guarding the nondescript warehouse where the senator's daughter was tied up; meanwhile in the real world, my friend was quickly crumbling under the weight of her own emotional challenges. I had an important decision to make.

In the heat of the moment, my soul cried out, “but what would Walker Texas Ranger do?” The answer was easy. I immediately turned off the television and reached for my cell phone. Once again, right prevailed and evil was vanquished.

Sunday, January 10, 2016

I See... The Cool School

After four decades of incessant and vitriolic criticism of University of Utah, the Dark Sith Lord in the universe of Utah inter-collegiate rivalry, the Mormon Third Eye is honor-bound by it's own code of observation ethics to offer congratulations as the Utes join the ranks of really cool schools. What has changed in Far East Salt Lake City to warrant their elevation to such a lofty level? It's easy. When Ute's basketball coach Larry Krystowiak violated the sanctity of the longstanding 106-year BYU-UofU rivalry and unilaterally cancelled their next game with the Cougars, they became... well... trendy. And trendy is cool.
Image result for Ute basketball\
I know that a lot of diehard BYU fans, like coach Rose in particular, were incensed when Krystowiak pleaded with the BYU AD to indefinitely postpone future games with the Cougars. We could call them sissies and fraidy-cats, and perhaps be right but immature. The reality is, however, that we live in an era where breaking covenants and commitments, implicitly or explicitly, has become commonplace. Whether it be spouses breaking marriage covenants, government employees breaking sworn oaths to not disclose classified data that results in irreparable harm to national security (ala Edward Snowden), or even something as simple debtors willfully deciding to avoid contracted debts via bankruptcy procedures, the sanctity of keeping oaths, covenants, promises, and commitments has gone the way of one-peice bathing suits and eight-track music players. We've descended a long ways from reformed Lamanites thousands of years ago who suffered death in choosing to keep oaths to “bury their swords deep in the earth.” Keeping commitments just not cool anymore. It is not a part of the current trend.

Hence my conclusion that the University of Utah, as represented by it's basketball coach, is a trendy modern institution of higher learning in pursuit of relative truth and occasional commitment to shifting morality, whereas BYU still languishes in the academic backwater of old-fashioned, outdated principles of integrity, honor, and commitment. I have a sneaking suspicion that BYU will never rise to or surpass the U's more modern, trendy investment in convenient commitment.


I hope it never does.